INFO

AAM

AAM

Type
Conference
Location
Athens
Date
2023
Code
RES_00000_ESO_23
Status
Completed

The participation in the ESO conference revolved around issues of release of architectural creation. Many say that architecture is form and function, others say that function comes first and form is just its consequence.
Take for example the architect Bernard Tschumi, whose design for the Villette Park in 1983 liberated architecture from its predetermined function. The possible use of the proposal is up to the user. Thus architecture can be developed exclusively as an artistic process. In this case it can be developed as a system of three-dimensional artworks whose interpretation depends on the user.
The design of the industrial building in Drama, (R-CAP-01, R-CAP-02), is free from the constraints of anthropocentric operation, preparing the ground for the creation of a hybrid. It is a machine outside the human scale, in which everything is automated and in which man is not conceived, except for the needs of maintenance. We observed that the building is adjacent to the boundary of a significant height difference of about three meters between the two levels of the industrial campus. Part of the roof is used to connect the two levels with a ramp, integrating the adjacent park – which created staging areas that can be interpreted in terms of their use by visitors. Each possible use is accompanied at the same time by a direct view of the machinery through the transparent shell. Thus, the “inhuman” building program of the project creates a condition of revision of the relevant architectural vocabulary, leaving the user free to enter the interior of the machine. The main concern, therefore, is to reconsider the archetype of the adjacent buildings, at the level of their form and their external, for interpretation, use.
In the historical building AGET Hercules (AGET), an attempt was made to highlight its brutalist character, its historical materiality, its fa├žade roof, through a cartesian logic, in all individual construction and functional elements. However, the primary aim was not to highlight the architectural findings of the Brutalist movement, but to neutralize them through water, light, shadows and reflections, and even sound.
In the office building in the southern suburbs (VOB), the design is inspired by the modernist model and its archetypal application in Greece, in the form of the apartment building. Here, an allegory is attempted, reflecting the deconstruction of the modernist model, as it has been expressed in the domestic urban planning scene.
Then, in Nidri of Lefkada (NYBH), the proposed hotel results from the exploration of the natural history, highlighting the natural background of the area which unfortunately has disappeared due to anarchic building. The idyllic destination presented in the images of the project is located in the heart of the urban fabric. The Hotel turns its back on the city, opens up and is shaped by the adjacent natural landscape. The hotel entrance is a gateway between the after and the before, the outside and the inside, the anarchic construction and nature.
In tea house in Kolonaki, (TO TSAI), the commercial need gives way to a strict construction system, aiming to respond to the storage and display needs of the company’s products with the disruptive qualities of op art in terms of the perception of space. It is a space that transforms the strict building system into a system with fluctuating boundaries.
A little further down, in the archaeological thematic museum of Piraeus (ATEMP), the rawness of the obvious concrete is combined with the situanistic memories of a poet named D. Mr. D wanders around the Museum and defines with his individual poems the physical entity of the 5 sections of the building. His poems become floors, rhythm perspectives and walls, at the same time composing and disassembling the museum spaces.
Finally, in the building of the region of Attica, in Elefsina (PEDA), an attempt is made to interpret the basic principles of democracy and translate them into spatial arrangements. The idea is simple and obvious. It stems from the demand for transparency in the public sector, as well as the constant need to review and evaluate the relevant procedures, which essentially shape the quality of our democracy.

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